April 21, 2014

Easter 2014 Celebration & Egg Dying Experiments: Ombre, Shaving Cream, and "Dragon Eggs"!

Happy Monday KorKers!

     It’s been a while….again. Between papers, projects, and working at my internships, and my home life, I finally have a moment to breathe and blog again. I’ve missed it.

     This past weekend, I spent some time with my older sister Rachel and brother-in-law to catch up with them and to entertain my sister some since she was on Spring Break (she’s a teacher). What I forgot though was that when she and I planned out when I went to visit is that it was Easter weekend. Needless to say, I spent most of my Easter with them and her wonderful in-law’s side of the family.
 
Some of the new chicks on my Brother-in-law's farm!
     To those of you who celebrate Easter, I hope you had a blessed one filled with joy! I definitely did, and to celebrate the holiday, my sister and I had a bit of fun when I stayed over at her house: we dyed eggs- A LOT OF THEM- in multiple ways.

NOTE: SOME OR ALL OF THESE MAY NOT WORK AS WELL AS IT DID FOR US. IT SORT OF DEPENDS ON HOW STRONG YOUR DYE IS, TIME SPENT, ETC.

So, let’s begin!

     Rachel and I did three different dying experiments. We either came up with the idea on the spot or were inspired by various Pinterest posts. They were: ombre eggs, dying eggs with shaving cream, and as I liked to call them, “dragon eggs.”

     Here are the various items that we used: hardboiled eggs, vinegar, dying kits, bowls for the dye, shaving cream, food coloring, paper plates, and a spoon.

     Before we did anything, we hardboiled our eggs.



For ombre eggs:

     Create your dyes and place them into containers (we color-coded ours by mixing the dye first in small cups), making sure that the container is large enough for water to be added into.

     Carefully place a hardboiled egg into each container, and wait for about 5-7 minutes for the dye to set in.


     Add some water in each container, a little higher than the starting point, and let the eggs sit for another 5-7 minutes. As the dye is diluted, the color of the dye will be lighter.


     Continue adding water and letting the eggs soak in the dye; until the egg has been completely covered with the dye water and has sat for the 5-7 minutes.


     Carefully take each egg out and place it onto a drying rack or paper towels on a plate. Wait until the eggs are completely dry before moving them.


Voila! You now have ombre eggs!



For “Dragon Eggs”:

     Rachel and I cracked the shells of a handful of the hardboiled eggs. She cracked them with a spoon, whereas I used my knuckles as if I were knocking on a door.


     Once they were cracked, she and I placed them into the dyes to sit and soak for around 15 minutes or more. (Depends on how strong the dye is)


     Once we took the eggs out of the dye, we set them out to dry on a paper towel. As they dried, they made a pretty crackled pattern, and I couldn’t help but think that they looked like dragon eggs (I blame my binge watching of Game of Thrones).


     Once they were completely dry, Rachel and I carefully peeled each one to reveal a marbled look to the eggs. And VOILA: Dragon Eggs! I was a bit upset when Rachel ate two of them before I realized it. Oh well.



For Shaving Cream Eggs:

     This one was an entertaining experiment for sure! Rachel and I took a few paper plates and spread out a layer of shaving cream over them about ¼ of an inch high.

     Then, with the food coloring, we made small drops of different colors (about 2-3 colors work well) around the top and marbled it together with a toothpick. It’s similar to making swirls in a cheesecake, so to say.


     Next, we took the hardboiled eggs and carefully placed them into the shaving cream before rolling them to the other side. As we rolled them, the egg picked up the shaving cream and the food coloring, making it look marbled and fluffy.


     Carefully pick up the egg and place it into a container, lined with paper towels preferably, to dry.


     Continue to do this until the rest of your eggs are done, and let them dry. Once the shaving cream is mostly dry, take a clean paper towel and wipe off any remaining shaving cream. Voila! You have shaving cream dyed eggs!

     The food coloring stays onto the eggshell, giving a tie-dye or marbled effect.

Overall, I hope you all had a wonderful Easter (if you celebrate it), and have a great week ahead!

     Reminder, If you have any suggestions for future posts such as recipes, DIY projects, Pinterest projects (to see if they're true or not), or even what I think of a specific film, music genre, band, YouTuber, whatever- send them my way! Post them in the comments section below or on the fansuggestion page, post them on the Kool or Katastrophy Facebook Page, tweet them to me on Twitter, or email me at koolorkatastrophy@gmail.com!

My Social Media links are HERE.

Until next time!

-Katie <3